22 Tips on What to Wear For a TV Interview

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Recently one of my author clients was featured on FOX News Boston. Before he was interviewed on camera he was nervous but was able to recall the media training that we put him through a few weeks earlier. That, along with a pep talk, and he was good to go.

What about YOU? Are you ready to be interviewed by local or national TV? If you’ve not had media training, believe me it’s too late once you get the call. You may have to get in a car or on a plane within an hour’s notice. It’s too late to get the training then. That’s why you need to be prepared before you get the call.

My experience as a publicist has convinced me that one of the greatest concerns about being interviewed on television is what to wear. For radio or newspaper interviews, fashion doesn’t matter but how you appear is critical for TV. When my clients agree to media coaching, my first choice for them to work with is TJ Walker, CEO of Media Training Worldwide.

TJ Walker is one of the leading authorities on media training in the world. With more than 20 years of media training experience, Walker has trained thousands of CEOs, authors, and experts, including leading government officials in the United States, European Prime Ministers, and African diplomats.

Here’s a quick list of “What to Wear and Not Wear!” that TJ Walker and other media coaches have developed that I share with you now so you can look terrific for your TV interview.

1. Don’t wear white, black or red. White glows and becomes the most noticeable thing on the TV screen. Black is too harsh and can suck up all the light. Reds “bleed” on camera and are distracting.

2. Pastel shirts work well on TV.

3. The safest color on TV is blue.

4. Don’t wear dangly earrings. They distract.

5. Remove jewelry that moves, makes noise, or could hit your microphone.

6. Be wrinkle-free.

7. Don’t wear stripes, herringbone, small intricate designs, or flashy jewelry. They are hard for a TV camera to pick up on.

8. Don’t wear checks.

9. Dress in a simple, boring manner, unless you are a fashion designer.

10. TV viewers should focus on your face and what you say, not your clothes.

11. Men should have about an inch of their shirt cuff showing.

12. Avoid light colored pants.

13. Wear over-the-calf socks so your skin doesn’t show if you cross your legs.

14. Don’t wear more than one ring per hand.

15. Women shouldn’t wear short skirts if you want people to focus on your message.

16. If you wear a dark shirt, dark suit, and dark tie, you will look like you are auditioning to be a hit man on the “Sopranos.”

17. Vests look stuffy on TV.

18. Don’t wear stripes. They dance around on the screen and are distracting.

19. Avoid hair products that add shine.

20. No visible logos or companies or brands, except for your own company logo.

21. People shouldn’t judge you by your appearance, but they will.

22. If you do or wear anything distracting on TV, people will remember that and nothing you say.

Clothes are the major factor in controlling how you appear to viewers. While appearance is critical for success on television you also must be concerned about the words that come out of your mouth, the knowledge you display, and the self-confidence you demonstrate. Media coaches like TJ Walker and marketing experts like myself will make sure you are fully prepared for your big day!

The bottom line: RELAX, you’ll do fine. The butterflies you’re feeling are what will drive you to do your best! Remember, it’s not like they are going to ask you the square root of 656! They’re asking you about your book, your company, your story which you obviously know. Just follow these helpful tips, talk things over with your publicist and you’ll look as good as you sound.

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Online TV – How Does Online TV Work?

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Everyone loves TV right? Things have certainly come a lot in leaps and bounds since the old TV was invented.

Why not watch TV online? Not just TV from your area, not even regular cable TV, but be able to get TV from all over the world. Think about being able to use the power of the internet and have 2000, 3000 or even over 4,000 channels straight to your computer at home or even work.

Well that’s what is happening today. Online TV works like regular old TV. Broadcasters for regular TV put out their signal and your antenna at home picks up the signal and there you have it, you have TV ( that was a very simple version ). Well online TV works the same way. There are so many channels from around the world and all these companies are realizing that the internet is where they need to put their product.

The power of broadband and some nifty software can enable people like your self to be able to watch your favorite sports events live ( and not pay for pay per view ) you can also watch all your favorite movies & TV shows and basically keep up to date with anything that is going on in the world.

To recap, online TV works pretty much the same way as normal TV does. Broadcasters are now using the internet as another way to broadcast their channels, and for us it is a great opportunity to take advantage of. Really the software that has been made to put all these channels together in one place is what really make online TV work well.

As internet connections get faster and, eventually you will see a PC hooked up to the family flat screen and everyone watching online TV.

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What Apple Could Learn from Microsoft: Front Row Versus Windows Media Center

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While the iMac G5’s software interface for multimedia – Front Row – is new to the Mac platform. Windows users have had similar tools – in Microsoft’s Windows XP Media Center Edition – for a couple of years now. Is it possible that, as Front Row matures, it could learn a thing or two from Windows?

Feel the music

For music, Front Row gives you a large, text only interface with few options. You can shuffle the playback order of songs and search by several criteria. You can’t create playlists, but you can access playlists you’ve already created in iTunes. And you can’t browse internet radio stations, but you can access stations you’ve bookmarked in iTunes.

Media Center gives you those same navigational and playback tools, and then goes a couple of steps further. It shows album artwork and also provides a search engine that will show results as you enter characters on the remote control. Some Media Center PCs have over-the-air radio tuners, but the software will also let you access internet radio stations.

You can’t browse or buy new songs through Front Row; for that, you must use iTunes. Media Center displays a prominent ‘Buy Music’ button once you start playback, but clicking on it calls up a page of albums and a ‘Not designed for Media Center’ message. In other words, it doesn’t work any better than Front Row.

DVDs on the menu

Because the iMac G5’s remote has only six buttons, the fast-forward and fast-rewind buttons must do double duty as chapter advancing buttons. And you can’t adjust the volume until after you begin playback. DVD playback is pretty simple, but you will find out that the wrong buttons are often pressed.

The remote control supplied with Media Center PCs has dedicated buttons for nearly every DVD function, so it is easy to look at the remote and pick exactly what you want to do. The interface is quite snappy, so you’ll always get confirmation that button presses has registered.

Straight to video

Front Row gives you easy access to movie files and video podcasts stored on your iMac, and to movie trailers stored on Apple’s servers. You can play back TV shows, too, but you have to use iTunes to find and purchase them. Everything playbacks in full-screen window, which makes the 320 240 pixel TV shows look pretty fuzzy.

Media Center lets you play back videos of all sorts on your PC, and lets you burn them to CD or DVD with a couple of clicks. But it also gives you access to tons of online content, including movies from CinemaNow (www.cinemanow.com), pre-recorded television shows from Akimbo.com, and news broadcasts from Reuters and other services. One huge irritation with Media Center is that clicking on some buttons calls up ads for paid content.

But when it comes to television, Media Center’s biggest advantage over Apple’s offerings is that you can connect a Media Center PC to a TV, often through high quality component connections. Media Center plays, pauses, and records television programmes; if the PC has a TV-tuner card with two tuners, it simultaneously record two programmes and play back a third.

You can add an external TV tuner and digital video recorder, such as Elgato Systems’ EyeTV, to the iMac G5, but Front Row won’t have anything to do with it.

Currently, you can view over-the-air High-Definition (HD) broadcasts only with Media Center, and then only if the PC’s TV and supports HD. Microsoft recently announced that Media Center PCs with CableCard support will appear by Christmas; those systems should be able to play, pause, and record HDTV programmes, without the need for a set-top cable box.

A Media Center PC particularly outdoes the iMac in one area: it can’t act as a server, distributing content (including time-shifted television) to other devices throughout the house. Those devices include Media Center Extenders and the new Xbox 360, which has built-in wireless networking.

Playing catch-up

When it comes to controlling a multimedia computer, OS X isn’t anywhere near Windows XP Media Center Edition. But Media Center has been around for more than three years; comparing the fledgling Front Row to it is about as fair as comparing a bicycle to a BMW. And Apple’s success with digital audio players – which weren’t new when it began selling them – shows that the company can enter a product category and outdo the competition by offering better features and more style.

Clearly, Mac users are not going to be buying Media Center-equipped PCs anytime soon (and the same is true for Windows users and iMacs). But if Front Row picks up some of the extra features that Media Center has acquired over the years, those users may soon have reason to be very, very happy.

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